Firefighter Fatalities

by admin on October 18, 2011

Firefighter Fatalities

Firefighter Fatalities are a fact of life, a “cost of doing business”, so to speak. Even so, every one of these deaths that are accounted below represents a person, a human being, a Father, Brother, Uncle, “Daddy”, Sister, Mother, Aunt, “mommy”. These real people made the ultimate sacrifice and gave their lives helping someone else. Many of these deaths could have been avoided if the person could have communicated to the on-scene commander that they needed help. (continued below)


U.S. Firefighter Fatalities

Year Deaths Fireground
Injuries
Total
Injuries
1992
75
52,290
97,700
1993
77
52,885
101,500
1994
104
52,875
95,400
1995
96
50,640
94,500
1996
95
45,725
87,150
1997
94
40,920
85,400
1998
91
43,080
87,500
1999
112
45,500
88,500
2000
105
43,065
84,550
2001
1021
41,395
82,250
2002
101
37,860
80,800
2003
113
38,045
78,750
2004
119
36,880
75,840
2005
115
41,950
80,100
2006
107
44,210
83,400
2007
118
38,340
80,100
2008
118
46,595
79,700
2009
90
32,205
78,150

1 Does not include 344 firefighters who died in the line of duty at the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
(From above)
Or, better yet, what if the on-scene commander had been reminded that one of his firefighters was overdue for checking in? Or what if they knew that the firefighter was approaching the end of their air supply and weren’t exiting the structure? They could have asked if the firefighter was in trouble and if no response, could have sent in the assistance team before the person became a firefighter fatality statistic.

Tri-Sentinel’s initial product is the Firefighter Automated Accountability System or (FAAS), which gives the on-scene commander that capability and the individual firefighters the assurance that someone has their eye on them besides their “guardian angel.”

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